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The son of a builder, Charles Wilson, served his architectural apprenticeship under the auspices of that other great Glasgow architect David Hamilton. During the period from 1827 to 1837 he contributed to the design and building of Hamilton Palace, Lennox Castle and Toward Castle. In Glasgow, he worked with Hamilton on the conversion of the Cunningham Mansion into the Royal Exchange.

Charles Wilson left the David Hamilton practice in 1837 to enter into partnership with his brother John. Their partnership ended in 1839 and Wilson set up his own practice at 41 George Square. The first two years would see him occupied with commissions to build a series of small churches and villas. In 1841, he was commissioned to design and build the Glasgow Royal Asylum for Lunatics at Gartnavel.


Charles Wilson
The nineteenth century would offer great opportunities for young architects wishing to express themselves. As Glasgow expanded its boundaries, huge areas of land were opened up to new development. One such development was the rocky outcrop of Woodlands Hill.
The lower slopes of Woodlands Hill had been partly developed in the 1830’s and the 1840’s. However, by the 1850’s, a proposed development to build the new university buildings on the summit had fallen through and Charles Wilson was commissioned to produce a plan for the Woodlands Hill and Park area.
He entered into a joint venture with surveyor Thomas Kyle to produce a plan which would become Park Circus, Park Terrace and Kelvingrove Park.
In the year 1848 he designed the gatehouse of the Southern Necropolis and his final resting place is within the Central Section.

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