“Roots In An Ever Changing Environment”
HOME. ABOUT US. GALLERY. OLD GLASGOW FILMS. NEWS. PAST SPEAKERS. CONTACT US. LINKS.
Copyright 2010-13 © All rights reserved. Made By Colmac.
OLD GLASGOW FILMS
GORBALS HERITAGE TRAIL
The land was owned in partnership with the Trades' House and Hutcheson's Hospital until 1790 when the area to the west of the line of the present Eglinton Street as far as West Street was transferred to the Trades' House (hence the name Tradeston), the old village was passed to the Town Council and the rest of the area to the east of Eglinton Street became the property of Hut­cheson's Hospital.
Soon afterwards, rapid urban growth was initiated, both east and west of the old village. To the east, the patrons of Hutcheson's Hospital promoted the development of Hutchesontown, its original principal streets being Adelphi Street and Hospital Street. To the west, on ground sold to James Laurie, Laurieston was laid out as a fashionable suburb with broad classical streets, starting in 1802 with the development of Carlton Place on the riverbank, and followed by "highly genteel" streets such as Abbotsford Place.
The advent of the Industrial Revolution changed the character of the area with the construction of the Govan Ironworks, better known as Dixon's Blazes. Buildings were demolished to make way for elevated railway lines. To house the workers in the local factories and cotton mills, the development of Hutchesontown was com­pleted with a grid-iron layout of four-storey tenements.
Carlton Place from Clyde Street
1828.
These original tenements, although plainer than before, still retained some classical influence in their design. The old village Main Street was demolished in the 1870s and rebuilt as Gorbals Street by the City Improvement Trust. A new focal point was created at Gorbals Cross.
The Gorbals became a busy place with wide streets bustl­ing with commercial activity. In the 1930s, nearly 90,000 people lived in the area. There were over 1,000 shops, over 130 public houses and an abundance of cinemas and other places of public entertainment. The Gorbals was a true community, assimilating a succes­sion of immigrant groups such as Irish, Jews and Lithua­nians. But backcourts became crammed with small scale industries and houses were subdivided, producing desperate overcrowding. As the City expanded, people who could afford to, increasingly left the Gorbals for better houses elsewhere and properties fell into disrepair. In the Gorbals as a whole, there was only one toilet for every three houses — and 94% of the houses had no bath. In Hutchesontown, the majority of houses had only one or two rooms. Conditions deteriorated to such an extent that, by the 1950s, most of the housing was considered unsuitable for habitation.  (to be continued...)
CUMBERLAND STREET HUTCHESONTOWN