“Roots In An Ever Changing Environment”
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OLD GLASGOW FILMS
BAND OF HOPE AND THE SATURDAY MATINEES

Some nights we went to the United Free Church in the street for the Band Of Hope.
We were given tea and buns, then we sang some hymns and then a lantern show was given. It was usually about an alcoholic battering his wife and their children always seemed to hide under the table. They always ended up with the man repenting and they lived happily ever after.

Saturday was children's matinee at the pictures. It cost a penny. We usually went to the Crownie in Crown Street or the Bees in Commercial Road. The ushers packed us in like sardines. We had to sit with our arms folded, no where to put our hands. We were afraid to go to the toilet as you never got your seat back and the ushers would get mad at having to shove all the children in again.
It was too bad if you were at the end of a seat as you kept falling off onto the floor.
The Crownie had all the exciting follow-up pictures like “Fu Man Chu”, “The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin”, “Tarzan of the Jungle” and later “Flash Gordon” so you had to go the following week to find out what had happened.
There was one follow-up when hundreds of children would get really excited and start screaming “there`s a hairy man coming”. I would be absolutely terrified. There was such a panic, I never ever saw him as I kept my eyes tightly closed until the screaming had stopped and I don`t know to this day who he was supposed to be.

















(Crown Cinema  1932)
www.glasgowcinemas.org.uk

We always kept a cat as the building was over-run with mice and my brothers, sisters and myself used to peep from the set-in bed and watch the mice. Some of the people in the street kept a dog, especially if they had rats. No one could keep a nice dog for long, because of a wee man called “Wee Archie”.
He wore a wee bunnet and a wee overcoat. He stole the dogs and sold them, usually over the Barrows.
One of the boys favourite games was going “rat hunting”. They would take their dogs round the middens at night to see how many rats they could catch.

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